Monday, November 16, 2009

more things I have learned thus far...

... if you don't eat before rounds and you have to change a wet to dry dressing and pack a particularly gnarly open wound in a stifling hot hospital room the temperature of hell while wearing head to toe PPE... you will pass out and bang the holy hell out of your head.

12 comments:

DammitWomann said...

Ouch !!!!

Adoro said...

You are the poster child for careers in medicine.

margaret said...

Took me a long time to figure out what to eat and what not to eat and how much to eat or not... to avoid not only dizzy spells but also vomiting along with the patient. Ah, happy days.

Smiley said...

vomit on the patient ouch. hehe i cant go to hospitals they make me claustrophobic. I dont know why but i cant go to hospitals the smell of a hospital makes me feel sicker and then the walls start closing in and i feel worse. Now if i wasa good catholic i would go ot hospitals and take it as penance but i cant.

The Crescat said...

yeah... nothing like vomitting into your face mask.

Minkykat said...

In mortuary school, the teacher told us over and over, "make sure you eat before coming to lab!"

In the beginning, some did not heed this and wound up having dry heeves from the smell of decomp and such.

Funny thing, after lab, those of us who had not been made ill by the sights and smells were as hungry as bears in springtime and would devour the local cheap-eat Chiniese place.

kired said...

Wow

runswithangels said...

Hey! Just for fun, should we tell 'em what wet-to-dry bandaging is? Okay! First, find one - as you put it- gnarly open wound, (look on the coccyx, ((that's the tailbone to you non-medical folks)), or the heels or elbows). Sometimes called ulcers, these crater-like sores range anywhere from the size of a dime or nickel to, oh, what would you say, 6-8 cm., and are sometimes purulent (that means full of pus, heh heh); then you take a wad of wet gauze, pack it in there good and tight, cover it with dry gauze, tape it down, let the whole she-bang dry, then do it all over again the next shift. And when you change the bandaging and pull out the formerly wet packing, yeah, sometimes its pretty dang gross.

God, I miss working.

How's the head? :-) It was an armpit dissection that almost did me in...

cordelia said...

it was suctioning trachs. that did me in. i NEVER did one after nursing school. i gag thinking about it.

runswithangels said...

Eww, gag cordelia! You are right. All lungy-hucky stuff makes me ill - funny, since my ball and chain is a pulmonologist :-)

eulogos said...

run with angels, how about the wounds which go all the way from both sides of a man's groin, all the way through and open towards the middle of the buttocks? I have had two patients with these, both young men who were paraplegics. We packed those with a lots and lots of strip gauze, soaked in Dakers solution (dilute bleach). It took several boxes of the gauze each time, and we were doing it twice a shift. The first time I did one of them, when the patient first came to our floor, I actually gagged and dry heaved in the patients presence and had to apologize to him. I think that is the only time I have done that.

Another bad one was the remains of a breast eaten away by cancer, from which necrotic tissue flaked away as we dressed it.

I hate the stuff in trachs, but one job I had in a head trauma rehab, the days I was treatment nurse I did it all day long, suctioned them and cleaned them. At least when I moved to the hospital job I was able to say that I was not fazed by trach and ventilator patients. They were surprised because this seemed harder to them than stuff I hadn't done. It all depends what the need is where you are.

It's the need that gets you over the revulsion.
The patient needs it, you are the nurse, it has to be done, so you do it.
Susan Peterson

kired said...

maybe a helmet