Saturday, February 20, 2010

when I grow up I want to be a nurse ...

... aside from raising my son alone, getting through nursing school is one of the hardest things I have every had to go through. Emotionally, mentally and physically. However, it is proving to be equally rewarding.

I must be honest; my original motives were hardly altruistic.

The job stability and salary that the nursing profession provides is what originally attracted me to the field. I am watching my mom struggle with unemployment, as well as hundreds of thousands of other Americans. I did not want that for myself. I wanted a profession that was recession proof and one that would provide my son & I with financial stability. Nursing seemed like a logical choice.

Instead, I have found, that nursing has developed in me a servant's heart. I think humans have an innate need and desire to do good and meaningful works. At the end of my life I want to be able to say, I helped people and provided for their comfort. I did good. My life was not meaningless and self fulfilling.

My patients need me. I do for them what their own family members refuse or can not stomach to do. They think I am there to provide for them, in reality it is they who are helping me.

I can't explain it. It defies explanation how God works in our lives and molds our hearts. All I can say is I know I am on the right path. My path is to serve.


Joseph Charles Franchre, c 1906

12 comments:

ehilton said...

My mom was an active nurse (she's "retired") for 45 years. She always considered it her vocation, not simply a job - a calling by Christ. The way she approached her job has always inspired me. Although I chose a different career, my mom's attitude towards nursing set a standard for me.

3puddytats said...

You are so right Kat--

Even though I was never a "professional nurse," I did candy striping in high school, had considerable first aid and CPR training as a life guard for a city swimming pool, and one of my "additional duties" while I was in the military was "medic's aid"--helping with charts and triage and first aid during deployments and war-time...patients always look to you as a source of comfort. No one really WANTS to be in a hospital--except those few individuals lonely and looking for attention.

Being there to fetch a magazine or a drink of water, or to write a letter or hold a hand.. like ehilton my career took me elsewhere but I have never lost the compassion for the hurting ones, for their confused and upset families. It also helped me to be able to visit the sick and infirm at home and hospital to bring them Communion.

I also learned it takes a very special angel to be able to work in a demensia ward..

Sara

Terry Nelson said...

You are so wrapped up in God's arms it is not funny!

belinda said...

Ms.Kat, You wont be forgotten as a nurse. I remember many of my nurses over the years and some as long ago as 42 years. I was just a number but their kindness meant something to me.

I remember the butt heads and the saints and I still hold a love in my heart for the saintly ones and I pray for the ones I've publically told to "hit the road".

People feel the real love and affection that you give. You cant fake that kind of stuff.

Good luck and God bless you in your vocation.

kired said...

You are the best nurse and mother.

Phillip said...

When my sister was dying of cancer it was the nurses who provided true comfort...the doctors were in and then out again so quickly. The nurses were there through the long nights and days, and when they helped her or brought her something she needed, that moment of relief when the nurse entered the room was a breath of fresh air...like "ok, maybe things will be alright after all." Never underestimate what bringing physical comfort can do to one's inner strength... that's you. I bet you are one of the "good ones", too. The kind of nurse that clearly cares about their patients... there is no way to sufficiently thank people like you, there are no words...

Angela M. said...

All for Jesus...if you've read "The Nun's Story" you know what I mean.

Old Bob said...

God bless you, Kat! One of my facebook friends is a nurse in the cardiac ward of the local hospital, and she tended both my mom and dad when they had heart surgery. I know two young women in the neighborhood who are coming to the end of their nursing schooling, and I have given them all the encoragement I can. It's a noble profession, I've told them so, and I hope God blesses them too.

Mrs Doyle said...

Both my parents are nurses, and while they'll never be rich, they have never been without work - thanks be to God.
It was a sobering reminder when we were little to see that we were not the centre of the universe - the sick came first and we were taught to always be grateful for our health.
Go you!

drawntocatholicism.com said...

My comment merged with something I had been writing already. If interested you will find it here and, God bless your nursing.

DammitWomann said...

Kat - when my mother passed way in my arms, I was so comforted by her nurse who said, "Let's pray." That immediately sent a warm blanket of love and comfort over me.

Yes, you are in the perfect profession.

Rob said...

When I was nine and my mother fory-one, my parents marriage came apart and, after losing our housem she was left with four kids and no education or job. She worked, full-time, for years at a Circle K and put herself through nursing school while we scraped by. She eventually became one of thchief administrative nurses at Phoenix Memorial.

I will kee you in my sinner's prayers.