Monday, May 03, 2010

Ok, good readers...

... I am in desperate need of a sabbatical. My priorities need to be regrouped, my spirituality centered, my nun gazing thirst quenched. I need to get away. Make a retreat. But where to go. I want to go somewhere completely secluded, preferably a convent and not a retreat or convention center.

Send me your suggestions.

the_crescat@yahoo.com


Luigi Busi, In Contemplazione

28 comments:

Tina in Ashburn said...

not a convent or retreat or convention center? sounds like a cabin in the woods to me. a state park?
how far are you willing to drive?

The Crescat said...

No, I said preferably a convent. Not a retreat or convention center. I don't want some new age spiritual retreat.. just a couple days in a convent where I can pray and be at peace. Not a group therapy type of scenario that most of those retreats @ conventional centers can be.

I am willing to fly if I have to. Anywhere in the continental US.

Suz said...

I'm not sure if they do retreats but ... check out the Sisters of Mary Mother of the Church:

http://www.sistersofmarymotherofthechurch.org/

They are just amazing

Maggie said...

Try Mepkin Abbey. It's a Trappist monastery outside of Charleston SC. It's beautiful and peaceful; the monks allow you to stay in guest houses and as a guest of the monastery, you can participate in as much of the Liturgy of the Hours as you'd like. I spent 4 days there as a senior in high school and it was, without a doubt, the most peaceful 4 days of my life. Plus, they make the best bread EVER. Here's their website: http://mepkinabbey.org/

Lee Gilbert said...

Monastic Family of Bethlehem of the Assumption of the Virgin and of St. Bruno

http://orthfullycatholic.blogspot.com/2007/01/monastic-family-of-bethlehem-of.html

Lee Gilbert said...

Further to the above- this site has a video:


http://www.lovetobecatholic.com/video_1481_Monastic_Brothers_of_Bethlehem_and_the_Assumption.html

3puddytats said...

After my dad passed away I needed a reboot....I spent a weekend in my local Benedictine Sister's monastery..the change of pace was just what I needed..no structured day, could pray with the sisters if I wanted to, dined with them, took a wonderful walk around the grounds but primarily rested...no tv, no phone, no computer...it did wonders, I left Sunday afternoon ready to face the new challenges that awaited..

God Bless.. Sara

John (Ad Orientem) said...

Kat,
Try the Saints Mary and Martha Monastery for women (convent) in Wagener SC. They have a small hermitage there for those seeking isolation and a contemplative period of prayer and withdrawal from the world. It is rather rustic conditions, but it sounds like that's what you are looking for. Their website has all of the info.

http://www.saintsmaryandmarthaorthodoxmonastery.org/

Christ is risen!
John

TheSeeker said...

http://www.monialesop.org/ This convent. I love them. I love their blog.

Fr. Christian Mathis said...

Mepkin Abbey is a good choice, or any Trappist place for that matter. Gethsemani in Kentucky is nice too, there are alot of people, but you come there as they do to be silent and to simply pray with the community.

Dr. Eric said...

The Pink Sisters in St. Louis have a pretty good convent from what I have read and what people around here tell me. I don't know if they'll let you stay but people to visit the chapel.

http://www.mountgraceconvent.org/home.html

Dr. Eric said...

I know the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest has a group of sisters that follow their charism. You might try them:

http://www.institute-christ-king.org/vocations/sisters/

Rick said...

http://www.monks.org/retreats.html

Abbey retreats are silent, unstructured and undirected. Private consultation with one of the monks can be arranged, if desired. Guests are welcome to participate in the Eucharist and hours of prayer.

Badger Catholic said...

Casket making Cistercians in Iowa
http://www.newmelleray.org/

I know people who go on personal "retreats" there(no groups). From what I understand it is a good experience, left to pray and read.

From website
One of the advantages of making a personal retreat at the monastery is that without a retreat director and fellow retreatants there is a greater opportunity for solitude and silence.

Terry Nelson said...

I love this painting!

Tina in Ashburn said...

sorry misread the "not" -

You might be ready for a silent retreat - stillness is hard to find, but utterly necessary to the human heart.

The places around here, near Northern VA are not the most conservative. Both the Trappist Monastery in Berryville and the Benedictine convent in Bristow leave much to be desired, IMHO.

Too bad, cuz I'd love to see ya!

Ellen from Buffalo,NY said...

The Abbey at the Genesee in NY.. Piffard,NY .. I went for a retreat there, they make bread. it can be silent or guided. It was very reasonable.
I went in 2002 and they only charged me $135.00 for the week. and it incleuded meals.
check it out..
Ellen from Buffalo,

Suaso said...

If you want to go some place far, far away where there is almost no sign of civilization, I suggest the Abbey of St. Walburga in Virginia Dale, Colorado. I was there for a few days. The nuns are very nice, and if you ask for work, they will give you lots to do. Real work, like digging up earth, landscaping, and milking cows. They chant the office from 4:30 am til 8pm. Very traditional and contemplative.

If you want something a little less secluded and would like to be around some lovely monks, I suggest St. Meinrad Archabbey in Indiana. It's a big monastery, lots of monks, and the Horarium is manageable for anyone with vigils at 5:30 am and Complime wrapping up after 7 pm. The monks are wonderful spiritual directors and that part of the country is stunning.

Jon said...

Kat,

I know of a few spots, but why not try the Nashville Dominicans? http://nashvilledominican.org/Vocations/Retreats_at_the_Motherhouse

(very cool web site).

Nashville's probably a seven hour drive for you, but they're solidly orthodox, joyfully happy, and won't make you bats with assorted silliness.

PS - Sorry I missed you at the blognic two weeks ago. The Boy was so subdued, I never noticed he was there!

Jon said...

Oh, and don't miss the intro slide show! http://nashvilledominican.org/

Elise said...

http://www.fsecommunity.org/index.htm
Best ladies in the world. Most of their centers have retreats. The one in MI is secluded, quiet, and restful.

Piotrek said...

Speaking of Trappists, the one in Huntsville, Utah is nice and secluded: http://www.holytrinityabbey.org/

Fr. Christian Mathis said...

I can attest for two more places mentioned....St. Meinrad is a very holy and peaceful place and the Nashville Dominicans are awesome though they may be currently under water.

Lola said...

No matter where you chose to go, please post a review/endorsement.

Thanks for the beautiful Busi.

God Bless you and enjoy your respite.

Rick said...

Even in religious life, the romance (spiritual) can disappear. Prayer becomes dry and hard. The inspirations don't flow. There are no feelings of devotion. The path is no longer scenic with flowers blooming and birds and butterflies on every branch. It is more like the dessert or the inner city skid row.


This is actually a good thing. It's yucky but it is a sign of progress in the prayer life. It is counter-intuitive but all the masters of spiritual life e.g. St. Ignatius of Loyola or St. Theresa of Avila write about this stage of prayer beyond the beginnings. It is not time to pack it up but to go at it no matter how boring. When St. Theresa was at this stage, she used to shake the hour glass to make the time go faster and be done with the prescribed hour of mental prayer. That's not how to go at it; that's how it feels though. Afterwards, one graduates into contemplative prayer. That's better than Nirvana or any kind of "high" because one "sees" God. Words fail to describe the experience; it's ineffable. People go into ecstasy. But before we start levitating, we need to go through the yucky and boring stage - generally. Some saints, like Bl. Teresa of Calcutta appears to have gotten stuck in this stage. Bummer. Imagine that, no spiritual consolations at all, just drudgery. It happens. But it is not a bad thing.


The measure of holiness is not how luscious, awesome or gratifying our prayer lives have become. Sanctity is measured by our love for God and that is even greater when we persist through the hard times. It is like loving a spouse with cancer - balding, skin and bones, blood-shot eyes. Love is love if one remains after the honey from the honeymoon is gone. That is holiness.

http://divine-ripples.blogspot.com/2010/05/when-honey-from-honeymoon-is-gone-in.html

Terry said...

Head to Clear Creek Monastery. There is a small convent just across the road from the monastery gate with some fine contemplative nuns.

Truthfinder said...

All my suggestions have been taken, ( I vote for the Abbey of St. Walburga, but alas, I've never been there either) but I LOVE the painting. Thanks for posting it, it is beautiful.

kkollwitz said...

The Poor Clares, just south of you, near Traveler's Rest.