Tuesday, July 20, 2010

I want this on a t-shirt...

... to wear to mass so the Romans will stop looking at me funny. I'm not doing it wrong.

9 comments:

Just another mad Catholic said...

I've got to confess that as a 'roman' I often Cross myself the Eastern way; sadly I'm having to train myself out of the habit as it might confuse fellow romans if I'm ordained.

fuinseoig said...

I must be stuck somewhere in the middle between Rome and Constantinople (which I suppose puts me geographically where I am, out in the Atlantic) because way back in the mists of time, when we four year olds were being taught by the nuns to bless ourselves, we learned to do it with the fingers as per illustration (index and middle touching thumb) but left to right not right to left.

Compromise solution? ;-)

Old Bob said...

I was baptized and raised Roman, but belonged to a Ukrainian Catholic parish for many years (wonderful folks, the Ukrainians). My hand learned the Eastern way immediately, it got into my soul, and I do it all the time now.

Donna said...

Did you change rites? I knew you strongly considered it, but I didn't know if you did the deed.

Smiley said...

Oh she will always be Roman as long as we have the Swiss Guards

The Watcher said...

Robbie Coltrane in Nuns on the Run ran it as 'Spectacles, testicles, wallet and watch,' and if I did that, I'd get the first two right, but then I'd be tapping my back pants pocket and my left wrist.

Must be an English thing.

(And no, I'm not Catholic)

nazareth priest said...

Did you check this out with Fr "is outrage"?:<)!

Suburbanbanshee said...

The fingers touching thumb thing is to proclaim the Trinity. But then, so is the three middle fingers of the hand being used. Both are used in various areas of Europe, probably depending on who's teaching the kids and where they were from.

All same same.

Suburbanbanshee said...

The fingers touching thumb thing is to proclaim the Trinity. But then, so is the three middle fingers of the hand being used. Both are used in various areas of Europe, probably depending on who's teaching the kids and where they were from.

All same same.