Friday, August 06, 2010

on solitude...

... sometimes I think God purposefully isolates us so we are forced to turn to Him for lack of an earthly confidant. At least I tend to think that is how He reaches the more stubborn of His children... myself included. Also, in the silence of forced solitude is when we hear Him best.

12 comments:

nazareth priest said...

Yep.

Victoria said...

Now that you mention it, I think you're right. I've been feeling exactly the same way lately.

3puddytats said...

"I am never lonely because I am never alone." That is kind of my take on it.

My times of attemped comtemplation are among my favorite times, as I can put aside for a few minutes the business of day to day, remove myself from human (and oftentimes feline) company, and just bask in the Presence of the Holy Spirit.


Sara

Christopher Lake said...

Kat, this is a powerful and insightful post. Thank you for it. One of my favorite songs by one of my favorite bands, the Minutemen, contains the line, "Our band could be your life." Well, this post could be my life at this time... actually, for the past two years, in many ways, and especially, the last few months.

Returning to the Catholic Church has seemingly cost me most of my circle of friends where I live. Strongly Reformed Protestants tend not to like it when one of their own returns to the Church. In another way, though, I've been somewhat isolated for much of my time here in Albuquerque, due to the whole "Cerebral Palsy, unable to drive, less-than-great public transit" dynamic. I can't say that I've handled it well. It would be much more accurate to say that I've regularly given in to self-pity and even anger against God.

He has me here, though, in this place of isolation, and until I can either move or somehow get out and about more to make friends, this is apparently where He wants me. May His purposes in this time be accomplished.

G said...

you've touched a chord with every Catholic, whether they admit it or not. At core, we're all isolated; either physically, emotionally or spiritually. It has to be that way bc, as you say, there has to a space inside of us for God to grow. He hollows out that space by letting us be aware of our isolation...& then gives us himself in the Eucharist to fill it!

And then we eventually see more clearly that we were never isolated at all. The truth is that, like you said in the post yesterday re: your joy in the Church, we are not only surrounded but immersed in a great cloud of witnesses...the greatest of which is the Trinity.

So, now when I feel my isolation, its a "happy pain", for lack of a better term, bc its still painful but I know its the just the flip side of the coin of union with the One I love!

Donna said...

He must have been working on me for many, many years. I guess I must be hard of hearing,

Just another mad Catholic said...

is that an Eastern rite or schismatic Nun Kat? Either way she looks beautiful as do all Religious in Habbits.

Oh and yeah God had to work on me for a LOOONG time before I heard him.

Christopher Lake said...

G, thank you for the helpful thoughts on isolation and the reality of the communion of saints and the Eucharist. I will be thinking about your comment here for some time to come.

Donna, I understand. I must be *extremely* hard of hearing!

The thing is (and I'm not yet sure if it's a *sad* thing or not-- it might be), I have almost unlimited opportunities, in my current state of isolation, for communion with God, which logically means that I *should* be relishing this time and growing from it. As things currently stand though, I simply can't wait to get back to D.C. and be out and about in the world again... sigh. This is just *too* much solitude for me-- or so I think. Obviously, not being God, I don't *truly* know what I need most. At least I have a fairly good idea that I'm not called to be a monk!

Mick said...

That's me alright. Been ploddin' along in my own little (probably presumptious) way before chest pains and two heart operations later I now realise what I've got to do. It may be a mountain, but at least I can see it now !

Nod said...

@Crescat - Tag, you're it!

The Blind Guide said...

So... St Ignatius' Discernment of Spirits discusses the utility of spiritual desolation at length. The RCIA candidates @ my parish had to read this in between weekly classes: http://www.amazon.com/Discernment-Spirits-Ignatian-Guide-Everyday/dp/0824522915/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1223490814&sr=1-1

Heavy, but life changing.

s-p said...

Oh my. This photo is an icon of my life. I've struggled for decades with "abandonment". The writings of St. John of the Cross and St. Therese etc. are what moved me out of the modern evangelical "clap happy" culture. (At the risk of shameless promotion my struggle with being "Abandoned by God" podcast here
http://ancientfaith.com/podcasts/stevethebuilder/abandoned