Tuesday, June 21, 2011

how my mind works...

... every time I see some one with a Chinese symbol tattoo, I always have to ask them what they think it means. And no matter the answer, I always silently suspect it really means "meat stick" or "golden pig noodle".

12 comments:

Jane said...

There's a website devoted to that:
http://hanzismatter.blogspot.com/

Most of the tattoos have characters that are simply meaningless, sloppy, upside-down, or backwards. Occasionally there are ones that mean something amusing or unfortunate.

Josephus Flavius said...

Hanzi smatter proves you're right...

http://hanzismatter.blogspot.com/

Elizabeth said...

My MIL has a Chinese friend who once corrected someone who had a "serenity" character hanging on her wall in a lovely frame...turns out it was a "Ladie's Room" sign...
LOL...

Piotrek said...

Years ago my sister had a dress with a "Japanese" symbol that looked like stick figures doin' it. Maybe it was just me. I was 17.

Elise said...

"Yeah, I got a tattoo, 'cause I want to show how counter-cultural I am. The Chinese symbol proves that I'm like, really, cool and into culture and stuff....It's unique, ya know?"

Julie said...

My daughter majored in Mandarin and East Asian studies and spent a couple of years in Asia.
Yeah, she's seen some doozies.
Believe me, there are LOTS of people walking around out there thinking they are proclaiming "serenity" or something else profound, when they are actually permanently tagged with something, ah, entirely different...

Julie said...

Aforementioned daughter believes most of these tattoo victims are practioners of the martial arts.

gayle said...

FYI, Cat, I'm having a hard time voting in your sidebar because I enjoy it all about the same...maybe not the grammatical errors.

Rich said...

I can imagine the snickers at the tattoo parlor......

silly white boy....now his right arm says, "Manure" in Chinese. HAHA.

TCN said...

Oh, it isn't "white boy," it is Kai Dai, or "white devil." There's not much love lost there, believe me.

The Watcher said...

Or it translates as 'you want pan-fried or soft noodles?'

Rich said...

An idea for chinese tatooists:

"Hit here" in Chinese